Tim Hardaway

Timothy Duane Hardaway Sr. (born September 1, 1966) is an American retired basketball player, currently serving as an assistant coach for the Detroit Pistons of the National Basketball Association (NBA). Standing at six feet (1.83 m) tall, he was best known for his crossover dribble which was dubbed the “UTEP Two-step” by television analysts. He is the father of current NBA player Tim Hardaway Jr. of the Atlanta Hawks.

In his rookie season, Hardaway wore number “5”, as Manute Bol wore Hardaway’s “10”. After Bol left the Warriors, Hardaway inherited it. Hardaway, Mitch Richmond, and Chris Mullin formed “Run TMC” (the initials of the players’ first names and a play on the name of the popular rap group Run DMC). As part of the Warriors’ attack, Hardaway was responsible for leading Run TMC’s fast break, displaying his excellent passing and one-on-one skills to complement Richmond’s slashing and Mullin’s shooting. Golden State made the playoffs during the 1990–1991 season, Hardaway’s second season and his first season in the playoffs. In the first round, the 7th seeded Warriors defeated the 2nd seeded San Antonio Spurs led by All-Star David Robinson in 4 games to advance to face the 3rd seeded Los Angeles Lakers led by NBA legend Magic Johnson. The Warriors managed to steal a game on the road in game 2, but could not defeat the more experienced Lakers, falling in 5 games despite Hardaway averaging 26.8 points, 12.8 assists and 3.8 steals for the series.

Hardaway averaged a career high 23.4 points a game in the 1991–1992 season, as the Warriors fell in the first round of the playoffs to the Seattle SuperSonics. The following season Hardaway averaged a career high 10.6 assists a game to get with his scoring average of 21.5, but the Warriors did not make the playoffs and would not return to postseason action for the remainder of Hardaway’s tenure with the team. As a Warrior, Hardaway made the NBA All-Star Game three straight years, and a knee injury kept him out of the entire 1993–1994 season. He reached 5,000 points and 2,500 assists faster than any other NBA player except Oscar Robertson. Hardaway played for the Warriors until the middle of 1995–96 season when he was traded to the Miami Heat along with Chris Gatling in exchange for Kevin Willis and Bimbo Coles.

Following the midseason trade to Miami, Hardaway started 28 games to finish the season, averaging 17.2 points a game with 10 assists. Miami made the playoffs but were swept in the first round by the 72 win Chicago Bulls. The following season was a huge success for Miami and for Hardaway, as he finished 4th in voting for the NBA Most Valuable Player Award, was selected to the All-NBA First Team as Miami won a franchise record 61 wins. Hardaway started in 81 games, averaging 20.3 points, 8.6 assists, while placing fourth in the league with 203 three-point baskets. He also played in the 1997 NBA All-Star Game, scoring 10 points in 14 minutes. In the playoffs, Hardaway averaged 26 points a game as the Heat defeated the Orlando Magic in the first round in 5 games, and then defeated the New York Knicks in 7 games in the semifinals, in which Hardaway scored 38 points in the 7th game. Miami would once again fall to the defending champion Chicago Bulls in the Eastern Conference Finals in 5 games.

Following the 2001 season, and with his skills declining with age, Hardaway was traded to the Dallas Mavericks on August 22, 2001, for a second-round draft pick. He was at one time Miami’s all-time leader in assists. With Dallas, Hardaway was mainly utilized off the bench, starting only two games out of 54 and averaging almost ten points a game. In the middle of the season, he was traded to the Denver Nuggets in exchange for controversial point guard Nick Van Exel.

Hardaway was traded to the Denver Nuggets in exchange for controversial point guard Nick Van Exel. With the Nuggets he started all fourteen games he played with them before retiring and becoming a basketball analyst for ESPN. While playing for the Nuggets, Hardaway was suspended for two games and fined $10,000 by the league when he threw a television monitor onto the court.

On March 27, 2003, Hardaway signed a contract with the Indiana Pacers, and in his first game registered a season-high fourteen points and seven assists against the Chicago Bulls. By the end of his career, Hardaway competed in five NBA All-Star Games.

On August 7, 2014, it was announced that Hardaway was named an assistant coach for the Detroit Pistons.

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Career highlights and awards
5× NBA All-Star (1991–1993, 1997, 1998)
All-NBA First Team (1997)
3× All-NBA Second Team (1992, 1998, 1999)
All-NBA Third Team (1993)
NBA All-Rookie First Team (1990)
No. 10 retired by Miami Heat
WAC Player of the Year (1989)
First-team All-WAC (1989)
No. 10 retired by UTEP
Career NBA statistics
Points 15,173 (17.3 ppg)
Assists 7,095 (8.2 apg)
Steals 1,428 (1.6 spg)

Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 2000 Sydney Team competition

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